documents

Ensuring Transparency in Stakeholder Engagement

The EITI is a multi-stakeholder initiative that aims to improve openness and accountability in the management of revenues from natural resources. It developed the EITI Standard, which contains a set of requirements that countries have to meet to ensure compliance with the EITI. The EITI Standard requires: effective oversight by the multi-stakeholder group; timely publication of EITI Reports that include full disclosure of taxes and other payments by extractives companies to governments; and a credible assurance process applying international standards.

This campaign launched in 2002 called for extractive companies to make their payments to governments public. Since an exclusive focus on revenues was not enough to ensure good management of natural resources wealth, the initiative widened its scope to also cover transparency and accountability at all points in the value chain. It is now structured around three pillars: 1) Publish why you pay and how you extract; 2) Publish what you pay; and 3) Publish what you earn and how you spend.

The G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines “offer Reporting Principles, Standard Disclosures and an Implementation Manual for the preparation of sustainability reports by organisations, regardless of their size, sector or location.” The Guidelines consist of two complementary and co-dependent parts. The first part – Reporting Principles and Standard Disclosures – identifies principles, standards and criteria for the preparation and presentation of sustainability reports.

The G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines “offer Reporting Principles, Standard Disclosures and an Implementation Manual for the preparation of sustainability reports by organisations, regardless of their size, sector or location.” The Guidelines consist of two complementary and co-dependent parts. The second part – Implementation Manual – contains practical guidance and explanations on how to apply and construe the previously identified principles and standards.

This document provides practical guidance on how to conduct a risk assessment aimed at preventing corruption. The Guide illustrates the following six-step assessment procedure: establish the process, identify the risks, rate the probability and impact of the risks, identify mitigating controls and processes, calculate remaining residual risk, and develop a corruption risk response plan.

This two-page fact sheet prepared by IPIECA and OGP demonstrates how the oil and gas industry can contribute to sustainable development through transparent business practices.

This guidance document provides an industry-specific framework for oil and gas companies to develop and enhance the quality and consistency of their sustainability reports. The document provides two types of assistance; first, it outlines ‘how-to’ steps which describe the process of reporting; second, it provides indicators of ‘what’ content may be included in reports on environmental, health and safety, and social and economic performance.

This Reporting Guidance aims to facilitate companies’ compliance with the Global Compact’s 10th principle against corruption: “Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms including extortion and bribery.” The Guidance outlines Elements of a comprehensive anti-corruption programme through which organisations can report their policies and procedures to stakeholders and the public. Each Reporting Element is supplemented with practical guidance on how to implement it and examples of what to report on.

This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the issue of royalty taxation that can be used by governments, industry, and civil society. It investigates the effects of mining taxation and specifically royalty taxation on the mine economics, the investment climate and civil society. It concludes with recommendations for governments and companies for the disclosure of taxes and payments generated by the mining sector and outlines transparency initiatives.

This publication “consists of guidance on doing business in societies at risk of conflict for field managers working across a range of business activities, as well as headquarters staff in political risk, security, external relations and social performance departments." See section 4 (Flashpoint 9) on ‘Corruption and Transparency’.

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